Month: June 2013

Buzz Report: Weekly Top 5: June 23-27, 2013

June 30, 2013

During the week of June 23-27, social media talk of the outcome of MBC’s Arab Idol vocal competition was contagious. When the Palestinian contestant Mohamed Assaf was crowned as this year’s Arab Idol, the topic generated to 278,989 comments, pushing the Arts category to the head of discussion categories this week for the fourth week running. The Arts category generated a total of 432,849 posts, followed by Politics which counted 219,532 comments.

Assaf was declared the winner of Arab Idol on June 22, excelling over Egyptian competitor Ahmed Gamal and Syrian Farah Youssef. On social media, reactions poured into various platforms, where thousands of users congratulated Assaf and the Palestinians for his triumph. Turning an eye to Egyptian social media users, several expressed disappointment about their compatriot’s defeat, but hailed the Egyptian finalist for his talent and called upon him to continue developing his musical career. Nada, a Facebook user, said: “Don’t be sad dear son of Egypt. You are a Superstar to all Egyptians.”

On another note, some social media users expressed doubts about the integrity of the competition’s voting results, claiming that Gamal had actually won but that votes had been forged for the sake of Assaf, due to the intervention and support of some politicians. Confused Angel wrote on Facebook: “All this, suddenly? He won all the awards; he became a goodwill ambassador for Palestine by audience votes? It’s a fake show, full of cheats!” Some Islamist users across the Arab world mocked the enthusiasm of Palestinians, noting that Assaf had not freed Palestine from Israeli occupation by winning the competition and therefore was not deserving of the outpouring of social and political attention. Some ultra-conservative social media users asked God to lead Assaf to a “repentance” similar to that of Lebanese singer Fadl Shaker, who joined the Salafist movement to engage in jihad. It was also observed that some users denounced the excessive devotion to the popular singing competition amid the escalating political developments in some Arab countries. Dalal Artemi commented on Facebook: “A woman is being raped in Syria, another dies of hunger in Somalia, a third has become a widow in Palestine…yet Arabs are worried about Arab Idol results!”

ARTSPolitics came second. On the evening of June 26, Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi addressed the nation in a lengthy public speech listing his achievements on the occasion of his first anniversary of ruling Egypt. On June 30, opposition groups plan massive anti-regime protests targeting his ouster. The top topic in Politics has drawn a total of 30,405 comments, in which social media users have commonly criticized the length of Morsi’s speech and the weak language he has used in a supposedly important speech. Khaled Ahmed wrote on Facebook: “Mubarak won half the people’s sympathy in 10 minutes, but in a 2.5 hour speech, Morsi made the people sympathize with Mubarak!!! Hahahaha God curses you, stupid.” Some users criticized the passivity of Morsi, who said he is aware of all the problems affecting ordinary Egyptian citizens. Many were irritated that the president publicly criticized his opponents and rivals, especially when he mentioned the former presidential candidate Ahmed Shafik.  It was also clear that several users had attacked Morsi for his criticism of Egyptian media professionals and business tycoons. Assem Nada wrote on Facebook: “I feel ashamed that you’re my president, Morsi. I never expected that you would grow more stupid every day. You have humiliated us before the whole world and made of Egypt a weak country, ridiculed by the world.”

POLITICSNews about the Arab Idol winner Mohammed Assaf also pushed the Society category to the third rank with a total of 35,874 posts. Assaf’s return to his native Gaza through the Rafah crossing border was the top topic in Society category. The talk generated 14,525 comments. As Assaf reached home on June 25, thousands of Palestinians gathered at the border to welcome the new star, holding banners and carrying his pictures. The Palestinian Youth and Culture Ministry announced a red carpet reception for Assaf, but hasn’t set the date for it yet. The majority of social media users expressed happiness and enthusiasm towards Assaf, wishing him the best of luck. Hamoud Siam said on Facebook: “The sweetest Assaf. God bless and protect him. This is the first time that our people have something to make us proud.” On the other hand, Islamist users disagreed with the exaggerated celebrations for the new Arab Idol. Some criticized his fans, who took to the streets en masse to welcome him home, describing them as “shallow” and “featherheads”. Another group of users said they were thrilled by Assaf’s success, not only because he deserves the title, but because he managed to bring Arabs together after long years of sorrow. Youssef Abou Hussein said on Facebook: “Assaf sings to unite the Arab nations. This is the son of Palestine who dedicated his victory to the Arab nations, thanks Mohamed Assaf, we needed this happiness after long years of grief.”

For the first time in months, Education category appeared as the fourth most-debated category on social media with 11,344 posts. In Morocco, the results of the General Secondary Stage exams of the year 2013 have been highly debated on social media platforms. Users generated 10,189 comments on the topic alone. Nearly 38% of the Moroccan high school students passed the baccalaureate exams. Some social media users wrote prayers on social media, hoping that all high school students would pass the tests. Scores of comments were critical of the education system in Morocco, with hundreds slamming the Ministry of Education for providing students with poor curricula and failing teaching methodologies. Daronnemok tweeted: “Congratulations to all the students who passed the baccalaureate tests. But don’t forget that it is a stupid evaluation to a stupid curriculum that doesn’t appraise your own skills.” Some other users lamented that many students overestimate their secondary school exam results. A Twitter user with the name of HWa9e3 said: “Some people are more worried about the high school tests than Judgment Day. They have poor faith in God.”

Media category was the least discussed category last week. Only 7,034 comments were generated in this category. The top topic in Media emerged from Saudi Arabia, when the tenth episode of the Saudi podcast Ashkal was broadcast on YouTube and attracted social media discussions, generating 5,468 comments, the lion’s share of volume in the media category. The episode explored a series of social and political events that recently influenced Saudi society; with highlights on tourism in the Kingdom and Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal’s wealth. Some social media users were delighted by the program’s bravery in displaying Saudi social problems in the series. Ibn Hairan al-Ghatfany commented on the episode’s YouTube clip: “It’s a wonderful episode. And brave too!” Khaleel Sunba agreed with him on Facebook. He wrote: “I hope Al Waleed doesn’t watch this episode and see how you make fun of him. He could shut your channel down.” Other reactions on social media opposed the extent to which the episode criticizes Saudi society, arguing that the content of the clips might eventually incite Saudis to protest against the regime.

ARTS, POLITICS, SOCIETYMethodology

These results above are extracted from thousands of social media sources such as blogs, microblogs, forums, message boards, readers’ comment sections on news websites, etc, which are continually updated. A team of Arabic social media researchers and Arabic social media analysts use Arabic Natural Language Processing and data mining tools to analyze the data and to extract the list of top five subjects, based primarily on keyword repetition.

The Weekly Top 5 displays results of the common Sunday-Thursday work week in the Arab world, and is solely focused on Arabic language user-generated results, classified by volume of comments/discussion.

Data is captured primarily from 17 Arab countries in North Africa, the Levant, and the Arab Gulf region, and when relevant, the five other Arabic speaking countries belonging to the Arab League (Sudan, Somalia, Comoros, Djibouti and Mauritania).

Buzz Report: Weekly Top 5: June 16-20, 2013

June 23, 2013

Throughout the workweek of June 16-20, buzz about the pan-Arab vocal contest Arab Idol continued to dominate social media discussion in the Arab world, with a volume of 230,211. The volume again made the Arts category the most prominent discussion category. This was followed by Politics with a total volume of 115,948.

The elimination of the Lebanese contestant Ziad Khoury from Arab Idol 2 was the most discussed topic in Arts category last week. Social media users, across several Arab countries, generated a sum of 178,627 comments on this development in the competition. Users expressed disappointment towards Khoury’s elimination and wished him a bright future in his career path. Other than that, thousands of comments were related to the statements of the Emirati judge Ahlam, who warned Syrian contestant Farah Youssef that she was being arrogant. Users disagreed with this assessment of the competitor’s behavior and expressed their support for her. Another large bunch of comments were dedicated to support the Palestinian contestant Mohamed Assaf and the Egyptian competitor Ahmed Jamal. On Facebook, Sundus Al-sabbagh wrote: “I assure you the Arab Idol is Mohammed Assaf.” But maha asho, commenting on YouTube, described Jamal as having “a very kind voice and full of feeling, it is a shame if he does not win. Please, Arabs, vote for him.” The majority of comments captured in this topic stemmed from social networks, generating 167,342 comments, followed by some 5,988 comments left on microblogs.

ARTSOn June 15, social media talk of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi announcing the “definitive” severing of relations with Syria placed the Politics category in the second rank among the five most-debated discussions. It generated 23,033 comments. In his latest public speech, addressing millions of Egyptians, Morsi said the country had decided “to definitively break off relations with the current regime in Syria, to close that regime’s embassy in Cairo and to recall Egypt’s charge d’affaires” from the Syrian capital, Damascus. As he spoke from a Cairo stadium, thousands of opponents believed that the conference entitled “Support for Syria” was intended to threaten the protesters and organizers of the planned June 30 protests against Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood and Morsi’s regime on his first anniversary of assuming presidential powers in Egypt. Several users condemned Morsi and his handling of regional developments. Some denounced the sectarianism in his speech which was critical of the Shiite sect of Islam, and said this criticism was merely intended to win the support of Egypt’s ultra-conservative Salafists ahead of the protests. Others accused Morsi of acquiescing to the US administration, since the speech followed the US announcement that it would begin supplying arms the Syrian rebels. “When a corrupted regime uses the revolution in Syria as a means to promote itself, this regime has hit rock bottom,” wrote Waleed Badawy on Facebook.  Another opponent agreed. Mohammed Abdelaziz said: “[Morsi] just wants to please the US which has decided to support the Syrian opposition.” However, a pro-regime user, Osha Koky, hailed Morsi: “God be with you Dr. Morsi. We wanted for long to have a real man as a president of whom we can be proud.” However, most sentiment expressed towards Egypt’s first post-revolution president was generally negative.

POLITICSMeanwhile, Egypt’s qualification for the final round of the African Cup following its defeat of Mozambique made Sports the third ranked discussion category. This development in the sports world generated 13,427 posts. However, some users were dissatisfied with the Egypt’s performance in the game against Mozambique, while expressed concern that the team might be defeated in the second round. Al Naser Salah Eldein wrote on Facebook: “With this level of performance, we will not qualify.” Other users criticized the Egyptian team’s American coach Bob Bradley, claiming he is not competent enough to lead the team to victory. Other users commended the Egyptian player Mohammed Abu Traika, and others denounced his performance. However, criticism of the team’s performance and coach was not enough to stifle Egyptians’ generally positive view of their national team.

In the Religion category, leading Saudi cleric Sheikh Mohamed al-Arifi’s call for jihad in Syria also created a substantial buzz on social media platforms, generating some 22,360 comments.  Reactions to his calls varied. Some commended the call for jihad and expressed their support for it, arguing that jihad is the only way to retrieve the Islamic nation’s glories. Aiman Siraj alorabi commented under news published on CNN’s Arabic website: “Announcing jihad is the right way towards Muslims’ glory and victory.” However, other users censured Al-Arifi for urging jihad during a sermon he delivered in Egypt. ShadI Alessy said on Facebook: “He is announcing this from Egypt because in Saudi Arabia he cannot say such a thing.” Some users believed that while making his statements, the Saudi sheikh disregarded the fact that the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has strong ties with the US. Nazir Maklad commented on Facebook saying: “He is a liar; his country is under US occupation.”

SPORTS, RELIGIONFinally, the Society category came last. The category has not generated more than 30,833 comments in total. The top discussed topic in the Society classification was news that the popular Egyptian preacher Amr Khaled had resumed his work despite a recent illness. The topic has made a total number of 15,937 comments. This is the second week that news about Khaled makes the top discussed topic in the society category. Khaled was infected with a rare virus that forced to hospital and refrain from any activities. In the past week, Khaled addressed his fans on social media to remind them that he trusts in God and that he is confident that God decides the best. Some users expressed their concern about his health and asked for updates about his health. On the preacher’s popular Facebook page, Saly Mohammad Farouq addressed the page administer, urging him/her to assure fans and followers of Khaled’s heath. Many other comments showed users praying for his recovering and praising his personality and doctrine. On Facebook, Yasser Khairy addressed him saying: “Dr. Amr Khaled, may God save you for this nation, Islam and Egypt because you are a unique personality.”

Methodology

These results above are extracted from thousands of social media sources such as blogs, microblogs, forums, message boards, readers’ comment sections on news websites, etc, which are continually updated. A team of Arabic social media researchers and Arabic social media analysts use Arabic Natural Language Processing and data mining tools to analyze the data and to extract the list of top five subjects, based primarily on keyword repetition.

The Weekly Top 5 displays results of the common Sunday-Thursday work week in the Arab world, and is solely focused on Arabic language user-generated results, classified by volume of comments/discussion.

Data is captured primarily from 17 Arab countries in North Africa, the Levant, and the Arab Gulf region, and when relevant, the five other Arabic speaking countries belonging to the Arab League (Sudan, Somalia, Comoros, Djibouti and Mauritania).

Buzz Report: Weekly Top 5: June 9-13, 2013

June 17, 2013

In the week 9-13 June, the live on-air vocal competition Arab Idol persisted as the most-discussed topic in the Arts category for the second consecutive week in June. Meanwhile, discussions of Arab Idol pushed the Arts to the top spot among other discussion categories this week, generating 196,026 comments. Politics was second with 121,886 posts.

As it entered its semi-final stages, Arab Idol continued to lure thousands of Arab social media users into a discussion of the competition. The majority of discussion focused on the elimination of the Iraqi Kurdish contester Parwas Hussein – who had been a source of controversy due to her decision to sing in Kurdish – and Moroccan competitor Salma Rachid drew 123,529 comments on social media. Many users expressed their resentment towards Rachid’s elimination, and others accused the judges – two of whom are Lebanese – Ragheb Alam and Nancy Ajram – of favoring Lebanese contestant Ziad Khoury.  Monia tweeted: “Ziad doesn’t deserve to stay. It’s a pity that Salma is leaving. Her voice is very powerful and sweet.” It was clear that the sentiment towards Rachid, despite her elimination, tended to be positive; towards Hussein, less so. Most comments appeared on social networks, though a few were generated on video sharing platforms. On the other hand, some users were glad to see Hussein’s exit, and that Syrian competitor Farah Youssef had entered into the semi-final phase. Sura Sura commented on Facebook: “It’s good that Parwas left! She should have been eliminated earlier…but Salma has a wonderful voice.” For the second week in a row, the second most discussed topic in the Arts category also emerged from Arab Idol. Users left 41,332 comments related to the Palestinian contester Mohamed Assaf and his high possibility of winning the competition.

ARTSDiscussions in Politics made up the second largest bulk of user activity last week. The category accumulated a total volume of 121,886 comments with news about the deadly clashes in Libya, generating the highest buzz. On June 8, clashes in the Libyan city of Benghazi between Libyan protesters and Libyan Shield Forces (LSF) troops killed 27 people and wounded dozens more. Many social media users criticized protesters for attacking LSF headquarters and accused the supporters of federation in Libya’s eastern provinces of inciting the clashes.  They are the brothers commented: “Look around you and you will find the Muslim Brothers behind every disaster happening in Libya. They are Saboteurs who are living with the 7th century mentality. Kick them out. They are the reason for the crisis, for what happens in Benghazi and in any part of Libya.” Users say the protesters want to destroy all forces that resist their secession plans. In the meantime, some fully support the “peaceful Benghazi protesters” who requested the dissolution of the militia coalition that “serves foreign agendas and known interests inside the country and abroad”. Many users lamented the dead and injured among both parties, and denounced the killings for the sake of minor personal gains. Muhammad Abushofa said on Twitter: “Oh dear God. People are killed on both sides. Who will support the families of those killed???” Meanwhile, social media users generally have taken a negative view of Libyan Army Chief Youssef al-Mangoush and the Muslim Brotherhood.

PoliticsDiscussions in the Society category generated 55,316 comments. News about Egyptian preacher Amr Khaled suffering a heart attack generated 24,001 comments. Thousands of social media users were deeply saddened by Khaled’s critical health condition, which required his transfer to hospital for recovery. While many users wished the popular and influential preacher a speedy recovery, others hailed Khaled as a model for a good Muslim and a moderate preacher. Eman El-Shahawi commented on the news on Facebook saying: “Speedy recovery Dr. Amr. May God bless you!” Khaled tweeted to his audience saying: “One tour at a hospital makes you say ‘Thank God.’” Despite his illness, many users said still await Khaled’s upcoming show Story of Andalusia which is scheduled to air in Ramadan. Others expressed their admiration of the newly introduced animation technique in his online Smile of Hope program. Mohammed Jouhri commented on one of Khaled’s videos on Youtube: “I like the animation that will attract children to follow you!”

Sports appeared in the fourth rank with only 46,631 comments. As Egypt humbled Zimbabwe 4-2 in 2014 World Cup qualifiers, social media users praised American coach Bob Bradley for his patience during the political crisis, which struck Egyptian football. Many users robustly defended Bradley against critics and commended him for leading the team to victory in all the qualifiers they played.  Mustafa Rifaee said on Facebook: “We are a strange nation. The man had patience and tolerated us, and all the country’s problems… we won on a foreign land, when in the past we couldn’t win the qualifiers…”

Users, however, attacked Egyptian defender Mahmoud Fathallah and blamed him for Zimbabwe’s score of two goals in the Egyptian net. Scores of users praised goalkeeper Sherif Ikrami for heartily defending the net against several potential goals. Some Islamist users praised Islamist-leaning player Mohamed Abu Trika, and used his name to defend President Mohamed Morsi. Ramadan Mohamed said on Facebook: “When Abu Trika, Hadi Khashaba, Mohamed Hommus, and Alaa Sadek and all the other respectable sportsmen support Morsi, you must know that Morsi is right.”

Religion was the least active category on social media platforms last week. Discussions of the influential and vocal Saudi cleric Mohammed Al Arifi led the discussions in this category, generating some 17,12 comments when he asked his Facebook followers to prepare for the Muslim holy month of Ramadan (starting July 10) by fasting in the preceding month of Shabaan. On his Facebook page, Arifi promised to give his fans the same attention he devotes to his Twitter followers. Some users praised Arifi for his sermons and inspirational sayings on his social media platforms. Siham Sahouma said on Facebook: “We love you too, Sheikh. We want you to honor us and come to Morocco.” On another note, Sheikh Arifi had also thanked the Physicians Across Continents (PAC) organization for their support of Syria. Some Bashar al-Assad supporters and Alawite Shiites attacked Arifi, who is an ardent opponent of Shias and enthusiastic supporter of the Free Syrian Army. Some users attacked the ultra-conservative Wahabi movement to which Arifi belongs and declared the cleric and other Wahabis to be disbelievers.

society, sportsMethodology

These results above are extracted from thousands of social media sources such as blogs, microblogs, forums, message boards, readers’ comment sections on news websites, etc, which are continually updated. A team of Arabic social media researchers and Arabic social media analysts use Arabic Natural Language Processing and data mining tools to analyze the data and to extract the list of top five subjects, based primarily on keyword repetition.

The Weekly Top 5 displays results of the common Sunday-Thursday work week in the Arab world, and is solely focused on Arabic language user-generated results, classified by volume of comments/discussion.

Data is captured primarily from 17 Arab countries in North Africa, the Levant, and the Arab Gulf region, and when relevant, the five other Arabic speaking countries belonging to the Arab League (Sudan, Somalia, Comoros, Djibouti and Mauritania).

Buzz Report: Weekly Top 5: May 26-30, 2013

June 2, 2013

As the week of May 26-30 drew to a close, the Arts category crowned the five most trending discussion categories on Arabic-language social media platforms, as Arab social media users thrilled over last weekend’s episode of the Arab Idol 2 vocal competition. The Arts category generated a total of 205,547 posts, followed by discussions in Politics which accumulated 103,344 comments.

In discussions of Arab Idol, news of the elimination of Iraqi contestant Mohanad Marsoomy drove the buzz. A total of 110,589 comments were dedicated to this topic alone; more than half the volume. Thousands of social media users attacked the Emirati judge Ahlam for shouting out her desire for a meal from Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC). Her outburst caused a wave of hilarity in the Arab Idol studio, and on social media, many users speculated that the Emirati pop star was probably drunk or had been using drugs ahead of the show. On Facebook, user Mariam Kitchen said Ahlam was “wasted”. Meanwhile, other users, especially those from Iraq, commented on the departure of Marsoomy and wished him well in his career path. Many believed that the Kurdish Parwas Hussein, also from Iraq, should have been eliminated instead.  Karam wrote on Twitter: “Mohanad is the best and it’s a shame that he left the competition. He is the best representative of Iraq. I am confident that he will have a better and fruitful career…”  Most of the comments generated about Arab Idol’s last episode appeared on social networks, with a total volume of 94,520 comments. An additional 12,609 posts were generated on video-sharing websites. Overall, analysis revealed that a negative sentiment has built against the Emirati judge Ahlam.

ArtsAs for Politics, the top topic was news about Saudi preacher and Islamic Scholar Mohamed Al-Arifi denying illness rumors, before firing tweets at Hezbollah Chief Hassan Nasrallah over Hezbollah’s interference in Syria. Arifi, a popular Saudi preacher, accused Nasrallah of suppressing the Syrian revolution and expected Iran to assassinate him once he has fulfilled his role in the Arab region. Arifi, a Sunni, is an ardent critic of Shiite doctrine, which he regards as corrupt. On social media, some Shiite users attacked Arifi and defended Nasrallah.  Reem Ghonaim wrote on Facebook: “You shouldn’t speak about Nasrallah like that! You and your likes have been exposed. You promote for prostitution and mass killing in the name of God. God curse you all.”  Others hailed the Syrian revolution. Speaking of his illness, Arifi denied reports made by an Egyptian TV channel that he was sick. The cleric said he was in good condition. Many users wished him good health. Walid Dabousi said on Facebook: “I was about to tour Riyadh’s hospitals to find you and check on your health sir. May God grant you with good health dear Sheikh Mohamed.” A total number of 17,382 comments were posted on microblogs alone, and another 7,765 comments appeared on social networks.

PoliticsThe Society category, which generated the third highest volume of discussion, was topped by user talk of a shared video in Saudi Arabia that showed a Saudi government employee attacking, with a belt, expatriates in the country waiting to have their official documents processed. The employee reportedly was responsible for issuing residence visas and other relevant documents for foreigners in Jeddah. In the video, he suddenly asks the people queuing up to leave the waiting area.  Scores of social media users were bothered by the employeer’s absurd behavior. Abu Zaid al-Shankeety tweeted: “This scumbeg must be punished for what he did.” Others defended the clerk, arguing that the clerk’s reaction was likely prompted by the people’s “disorganized behavior”. Too Oppressed commented in a website: “He only did that because of their barbaric behavior. It’s good that he did what he had to do.” The topic generated a number of 7,040 comments, mostly captured after the shared video. An additional 2,253 comments were found on Twitter as users debated the topic.

The fourth leading category was Religion. Egyptian preacher Amr Khaled’s invitation to use the new format of his widely-known A Smile of Hope program climbed to the top of religious topics. In all, discussions in the Religion category amassed 31,813 posts. Discussions on Khaled’s news generated well over half the volume; 16,315 comments. Many users commended the use of animation in the show’s last episode, and expressed hope that this would attract a wider segment of children and younger audiences. Addressing his fans on Facebook, Khaled wrote: “Here is the promo video of ‘Lemon Vendor’- the second episode of the animated version of A Smile of Hope. Watch it next Thursday at 7 PM.”

However, a picture of Khaled with his wife and two sons on a beach generated the most commentary. The preacher captioned the picture, “Thank God for putting my family together”. Many users praised Khaled’s family and wish them the best of luck. Other apparently more conservative users criticized Khaled’s wife for wearing only a headscarf, saying that the proper Islamic dress code for women is a full face veil. UmOmar al-Minawy commented on the picture: “Forgive me, but you are a preacher and a role model. How come your wife doesn’t wear the Islamic cloak and Niqab?” Other comments were about users’ prayers and plans to correctly practice rituals in the coming holy month of Ramadan, which begins this year in July.

Arts, Politics, Society, ReligionSports  was the least discussed category on social media platforms, with only one topic and generating a total of 26,974 comments. Discussions focused on news that the German football club Bayern Munich had emerged as the five-time winners of the Champions League after humbling their national rivals Borussia Dortmund 2-1. Hundreds of Arab social media users hailed the match and praised the performance of both teams.  Some other users lauded Bayern player Arjen Robben who scored the winning goal in the last five minutes of the match. Essam Al Chawal tweetedi: “Bayern are champions. To beat the Arsenal is huge. To win the UEFA you are huge. To crush Barca, you are giants. To win Champions League, you are heroes.” Many admired the entirety of the Champions League.  Ibrahim Elbargathi wrote on Facebook: “The best Champions League final I’ve ever watched since 1999.” Other users accused the referee of favoring Bayern Munich against Dortmund. Majdi Abdallah Mohammed wrote on Facebook: “The referee gave Bayern the title. If he kicked Ribéry and Dante out of the game, we would have seen different results.”

Methodology

These results above are extracted from thousands of social media sources such as blogs, microblogs, forums, message boards, readers’ comment sections on news websites, etc, which are continually updated. A team of Arabic social media researchers and Arabic social media analysts use Arabic Natural Language Processing and data mining tools to analyze the data and to extract the list of top five subjects, based primarily on keyword repetition.

The Weekly Top 5 displays results of the common Sunday-Thursday work week in the Arab world, and is solely focused on Arabic language user-generated results, classified by volume of comments/discussion.

Data is captured primarily from 17 Arab countries in North Africa, the Levant, and the Arab Gulf region, and when relevant, the five other Arabic speaking countries belonging to the Arab League (Sudan, Somalia, Comoros, Djibouti and Mauritania).